New year, new things

We’re all back in the saddle, post-holidays, and right back up to speed. We’re in the midst of a large-scale project connected to the upcoming Senufo: Art and Identity in West Africa exhibition– since early this summer we have been working on a multimedia tour for the exhibition that will be available as an app for iPhone. It’s a project that is both similar to many of the things that we do (either continually or regularly) already, such as our work on ArtLens and audio tours for selected special exhibitions, while also adding new experiences for the team.

recording senufo

One major change is that we are working in video from the start (rather than working with audio files and visual components). We took a swipe at something similar in the spring when we developed videos for the Caravaggio in conservation exhibition, and the lessons we took from that have been really helpful to this project.

still from senufo

Video presents challenges similar to those found in audio, as well as ones that are unique to the medium. (Such as, oh yeah, every time you want to cut our some phrase or word or uhm or uh, you can see the cut. Ohhhhhh, right….) But it also presents distinct advantages and opportunities, as well, such as getting a real sense of the people speaking, whether it is the curator or a West African sculptor. (We were very lucky to have video collected this last summer in Cote d’Ivoire).

Abou interview

Working on audio tours, multimedia tours, and creating video and audio files over the last few years has given me a completely different perspective on audio tours and apps when I see them offered at other museums. When I see wands or iPods or any other device being handed out at the entrance to an exhibition I now think a lot about the almost endless series of steps behind the outcome. Forty-five minutes of finished segments likely has months of recording, transcribing, scripting, editing, securing rights, reviewing, revising, re-editing, laying out the stops, cataloging all the information, getting all the credit information together, selecting thumbnails…

working on senufo app

It’s an astonishing amount of work. (But it’s a lot of fun).

Our research and evaluation team is going to be talking with visitors about their experience using the app, and we are excited to hear what they think– and what lessons we can take away for the next project.

In the meantime, we’re getting ready for a year of storytelling– lots of projects in the hopper for 2015.

make a story

 

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This is [only] a test

We’ve been experimenting some new things this summer. New programs:

yogainsession

Including yoga classes to go with our big summer exhibition. (Very, very popular)  I’m working on an interpretation project for an exhibition next year that will be quite different (in terms of both content and delivery) from our usual mode. (Very exciting!) The museum has a conservation on view exhibition happening throughout the summer, and we have a wall up inviting visitors to ask questions:

askanexpert

(Also quite popular with visitors).

We’ve also been doing some audience testing. It’s something that the department has been involved with in the past, but this summer the team is taking a deeper dive into the nuts and bolts of research and data gathering. One thing we’re looking at is interest levels for new content that we’re planning to develop.

content testing

It’s been fascinating to listen to visitors give their responses to some of the ideas. And (as always) there are surprises that pop up along the way. Some of my favorites have been:

One visitor said they would be interested in a tour of Medieval art because they enjoyed painting from that period. Soon afterwards another visitor said that everything was always about Medieval art, which they found boring.

One response to the tour topic “Surprise!” one visitor said they wouldn’t know what it was about, but they would be curious to find out. Another also said they wouldn’t know what it was about– but that they weren’t good with surprises, and rated it at the bottom.

In response to a tour on the theme of the Monuments Men one visitor expressed that they weren’t familiar with the theme, asking if that was pictures of Abraham Lincoln on his throne. (I think they were talking about the monument in DC).

It was interesting to see how differently different people responded to the same topic. We’re going to be doing content testing for at least another couple of months, and we’re starting to see some patterns emerging. I think a big part of what we do as we move forward is to think not only about which topics rise to the top in overall popularity, but also about niches. For example, some topics did not get a  lot of votes overall, but those who liked them really liked them. We also need to think about polarizing topics. “Surprise!” is a good example– people seemed to rate it either at the top or the bottom, with few in between. For those who were interested, having it in the mix was a real positive. The negative responses were very solid in their reaction– would the presence of something they were turned off by turn them off from other options?

We’ve also started testing program formats for adult audiences. We have some new types of programs that we’re going to be trying out this year, so we’re testing both how well visitors will understand the planned descriptions (this will be iterative over the next couple months), and how interested they would be to attend a program using the new formats. Can’t wait to see what we find out!